Loading... Please wait...

Gemstones

Alexandrite

About: Alexandrite is a magical stone that changes color depending on the light. In daylight it is green and in candlelight it is a purple hued red. Some Alexandrite change color more dramatically than others; the stones that have a 100% color change from red to green are the most expensive and desirable. Alexandrite was first discovered in the Ural Mountains of Russia in the 1830’s and helped to celebrate Czar Alexander II. Alexandrite is associated with self esteem, balanced life, and the ability to experience different feelings due to its ability to change color in shifting light. Alexandrite is used to celebrate June birthdays. It is also used to commemorate 45th and 55th wedding anniversaries.

Gem Species: Chrysoberyl

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 8.5

Sources: Brazil, Madagascar, Russia, and Sri Lanka

Treatments: Natural

Care: Alexandrite is rated “excellent” for daily wear. Gently scrub with a toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water to clean.

Amethyst

About: The deep purple color of Amethyst is often associated with emotion and nobility. Greek legend tells the tale of Dionysus, the Greek God of wine, who was one day offended by a mortal. Dionysus called forth tigers to seek revenge on the next mortal who crossed his path. The maiden Amethyst was the unlucky person who found herself up against the vengeful God-sent tigers. To save Amethyst, the Goddess Diana turned her into a statue of pure quartz. The frozen crystal maiden Amethyst was so full of beauty that Dionysus wept tears of wine over the statue, thus turning her a stunning shade of purple. This legend creates the gem that bares Amethyst’s name. Amethyst is used to celebrate February birthdays as well as the 4th, 6th, and 9th wedding anniversaries. This purple gem comes in a wide variety of hues from pale lilac to deep plum. The richer the color saturation the more expensive the Amethyst, as is the case with most colored gem stones.

Gem Species: Quartz

Moh’s Scale (hardness):  7

Sources: Africa and South America

Treatments: Traditional Enhancement

Care: Amethyst is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat, which could cause color to fade. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water or an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner..

Aquamarine

About: Aquamarine translates literally to “Ocean Water”; the name perfectly describes the stones color. Sailors believed that Aquamarine came from the treasure chests of mermaids. It is legend that the gem brings good luck to all who sail the seas. Aquamarine is also said to promise youthful energy, love, and health to those who wear it. Aquamarine is the birthstone for March and is also used to celebrate 16th and 19th wedding anniversaries. The color of Aquamarine ranges from a very pale sky blue to a medium ocean blue.

Gem Species: Beryl

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 7.5-8

Sources: Afghanistan, Africa, China, India, Pakistan, Russia, and South America

Treatments: Heated

Care: Aquamarine is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water.

Carnelian

About: Carnelian ranges in color from bright vibrant orange to a soft ginger color. Carnelian is a species of chalcedony and is typically cut into cabochon shapes or used for carving.

Gem Species:  Chalcedony

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 6.5-7

Sources: Brazil, India, and Uruguay

Treatments: Traditional Enhancement

Care: Carnelian is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to chemicals, heat, and protect from harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water or an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Chalcedony

About:When quartz forms from a number of micro crystals as opposed to one single crystal it is referred to as Chalcedony. Chalcedony is naturally colored; the blue comes from Africa and the lilac color comes from the United States. The soft hues of Chalcedony are very tranquil. Native Americans believed Chalcedony promoted emotional balance and vitality.

Gem Species: Chalcedony

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 6.5-7

Sources: Africa and United States

Treatments: Natural

Care: Chalcedony is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to chemicals, heat, and protect from harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water or an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Citrine

About: The name Citrine comes from the French word for “lemon”. The bright golden color of Citrine was once thought to protect the wearer from evil. Today Citrine is associated with vitality, youth, and joyfulness. 

Citrine ranges in color from pale golden yellow to a medium golden orange. Madeira Citrine refers to the deep brownish red hue of Citrine; it is named so for its wine colored hue. The color of Citrine is achieved by heating pale amethyst and transparent to smoky colored quartz. Citrine celebrates November birthdays as well as 11th and 13th wedding anniversaries.

Gem Species: Quartz

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 7

Sources: Bolivia and Brazil

Treatments: Heated

Care: Citrine is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat, which may cause color to fade. To clean, scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of warm water and mild dish soap, or use an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Coral

About: Coral was one of the first gems used for adornment; the use of Coral dates back to prehistoric times. Coral was believed to protect against danger and bring wisdom to those who wear it.

Gem Species: Calcareous

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 3.5-4

Sources: Australia, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia, Mediterranean Sea, Philippines, and Taiwan

Treatments: Natural

Care: Coral is not good for everyday wear; it is very soft. Avoid exposure to heat, chemicals, and protect from harsh blows. To clean, wipe gently with a damp cloth.

Rhodolite Garnet

About:  Rhodolite Garnet is known for its rich raspberry color. The history of Garnet goes back to the beginning of time. Garnets were favored in ancient Rome and Egypt for their believed ability to ward off evil. It is also told that Noah steered the ark by a lantern made of Garnet. Garnet has a very high ability to refract light, which may realistically explain why it was said to illuminate darkness and banish dark spirits. The natural rosy plum color of Rhodolite Garnet is so deep and beautiful that it attracts lovers of both red and pink.

Gem Species: Rhodolite

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 7-7.5

Sources: East Africa, India, and Sri Lanka

Treatments: Natural

Care: Garnet is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water, or clean in an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Mozambique Garnet

About: The deep harvest red color of Mozambique Garnet was once believed to have healing properties, particularly with diseases related to blood. Its organic color and affordability make red Garnet a popular fashion gemstone. Mozambique Garnet is the popular choice for January birthdays.

Gem Species: Pyrope

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 7-7.5

Sources: Africa

Treatments: Natural

Care: Garnet is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water, or clean in an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Tsavorite (Garnet)

About: Tsavorite is one of the only green gems to rival Emerald in color and brilliance. It ranges in tone from light spring green to deep forest green. Worldwide recognition of Tsavorite came in 1974 when Tiffany and Co. began promoting its magnificent beauty after its discovery in Tanzania. Finding rough Tsavorite crystals weighing over five carats is unusual so cut stones over two carats are extremely rare and valuable. Tsavorite is rated “good” for everyday wear so it is a great alternative to emerald which is a very soft stone and not recommended for everyday wear.

Gem Species: Grossularite

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 7-7.5

Sources: Brazil, East Africa, India, and Sri Lanka

Treatments: Natural

Care: Garnet is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water, or clean in an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Jade

About: Jade has been a prized gemstone by many of the earliest civilizations. Jade was and still is important in Chinese culture. It was used for tools and weapons and was also used for artistic purposes. As early as 3,000 BC Jade was considered a royal gem comparable to gold and diamonds. Olmec, Mayan, Toltec, and ancient Egyptian cultures also treasured Jade. It was a gem that represented love, harmony, and balance. Today, Jade symbolizes goodness, beauty, wisdom, compassion, and courage. Jade merges the ancient and modern. It ranges in color from pale apple green to deep leafy green. While Jade is considered a soft gem, it is a tough gem and is very resistant to breaking. Jade is often carved due to its toughness.

Gem Species: Nephrite and Jadeite

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 6-6.5

Sources: Australia, Canada, China, New Zealand, and Taiwan

Treatments: Natural

Care: Jade is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid contact with heat, chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. Clean gently with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water, or use an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Lapis

About: Lapis was one of the first gems used in jewelry making. Carved Lapis and decorative chains featuring Lapis have been uncovered in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome dating back to 4,000 BC. The color blue is plentiful in nature, but incredibly difficult to artistically reproduce. Lapis has been crucial in naturally creating the pigment ultramarine blue. Lapis was ground and used for painting. The mineral based paint was so treasured that it was reserved for cherished works of art. Lapis represents truth and friendship. It is believed that wearers of Lapis are more able to openly express their feelings and opinions thus finding a more sincere harmony with others. The deep blue stone gives a timeless style to modern looks that reflect ancient Mediterranean cultures.

Gem Species: Lapis Lazuli

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 5-6

Sources: Afghanistan, Argentina, Canada,and Chile

Treatments: Dyeing

Care: Lapis is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid contact with heat, chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. Clean gently with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water.

Moonstone

About: Ancient cultures believed this gem was formed by moonlight; moonstone seems to glow with the light of the moon itself. Legend told that one who held a Moonstone in their mouth during the full moon could see the future. Moonstone is a sacred gem in Indian cultures. It is believed to arouse tender passion. Moonstone has a very subdued translucent color that changes with every movement.

Gem Species: Orthoclase Feldspar

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 6-6.5

Sources: Australia, India, Madagascar, Brazil, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Tanzania, and United States

Treatments: Natural

Care: Moonstone is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water.

Onyx

About: Black Onyx is an extremely versatile and affordable gemstone. Onyx gives a powerful statement on its own, but is also an excellent accent stone when used with diamonds or other brightly colored gemstones. Onyx was once known for giving courage to Roman soldiers; it was often carved to represent Mars, the god of war.

Gem Species: Chalcedony

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 6.5-7

Sources: Madagascar, Brazil, United States, and Uruguay

Treatments: Dyeing

Care: Onyx is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to chemicals, heat, and protect from harsh blows. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water or an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Opal

About: Opal has an undeniably magical quality; it appears to be lit from within. All the colors of the rainbow are captured in this mystical gemstone. Opal is long thought to hold magical properties; it was for this reason that rare Opals used to be reserved for royalty. The crown of the Holy Roman Empire held a red Opal known as “The Burning of Troy”; it was a gift from Napoleon to Josephine and became part of the crown jewels of France. Queen Victoria was rather fond of Opals and often presented them as wedding presents.

Opal is often the choice birthstone of those born in October. It is also used to celebrate the 12th, 14th, and 18th wedding anniversary. The changing fiery colors of Opal are symbolic of hope, life, truth, and love. 

Gem Species: Opal

Moh’s Scale (hardness); 5-6.5

Sources: Australia

Treatments: Natural

Care: Opal is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid contact with heat, chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. Clean gently with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water.

Peridot

About: The bright lime green hue of Peridot has a very youthful quality. Peridot was believed to cause dreams to become reality and to ward off evil. Hawaiian people treasured Peridot believing it to be tears of the goddess Pele. Peridot was referred to as “evening emerald” by the Romans because its vibrant color did not fade in dim light, but instead seemed to glow. Peridot is the August birthstone and is also used to celebrate the 1st and 16th wedding anniversary. 

Gem Species: Peridot

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 6.5-7

Sources: Brazil, Kenya, Mexico, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Australia, China, and United States (particularly Arizona)

Treatments: Natural

Care: Peridot is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid contact with heat, chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. Clean gently with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water.

Quartz

About: Quartz is a very broad gem species. It encompasses many colors and aesthetics. Green Quartz is created by heating pale amethyst and is therefore frequently referred to as green amethyst. Lemon Quartz has a bright sunny color that is refreshing and lovely. Smoky Quartz has a robust brown tone that is deep and expressive. Rutilated Quartz features golden Rutile frozen inside clear Quartz; it is an incredible natural texture. Tourmalinated Quartz is appreciated for its inclusions. Black tourmaline crystals form inside clear Quartz providing a wonderful color contrast.

Gem Species: Quartz

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 6.5-7

Sources: Brazil, Madagascar, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Uruguay

Treatments:
Green Quartz: Irradiated
Lemon Quartz: Irradiated
Smoky Quartz: Heated and Irradiated
Rutilated Quartz: Natural
Tourmalinated Quartz: Natural

Care: Quartz is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight, exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water or an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Spinel

About: Genuine Spinel is a rare and durable gemstone. A fine natural Spinel rivals the finest rubies and sapphires in value. Spinel comes in pink and black.

Gem Species: Spinel

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 8

Sources: Black Spinel: Madagascar

Pink Spinel: Cambodia, Russia, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Thailand, Myanmar, and Vietnam.

Treatments: Natural

Care: Spinel is rated “excellent” for everyday wear. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water or an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Tanzanite

About: Tanzanite’s unique purple blue color, its rarity, and its exoticism are why it is such a highly sought after gemstone.  Tanzanite became known in 1967 when Massai herdsman in eastern Africa saw its blue crystals gleaming in the sun; this dramatic discovery caused a worldwide sensation for the stone. The only known source for Tanzanite is northern Tanzania near Mount Kilimanjaro. Tanzanite was named an alternative birthstone for December by the American Gem Trade Association in 2002.

Tanzanite is part of the Zoisite gem family. The colors range from indigo to violet to lilac to periwinkle. The dual color dynamic make each Tanzanite unique. Massai believe that the color of Tanzanite is sacred according to folklore; only women blessed with giving life are allowed to wear the color. Since the discovery of Tanzanite, Massai men began giving the stone as a gift to wives upon the birth of a child. It is meant to represent health and well being for the child. Through this tradition, Tanzanite has come to represent the celebration of new life.

Gem Species: Zoisite

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 6-7

Sources: Tanzania

Treatments: Heating

Care: Tanzanite is not meant for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. Avoid contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water.

Tiger’s Eye

About: Tiger’s Eye is a gem that displays the optic phenomena known as Chatoyancy. When cut in a cabochon shape, Tiger’s Eye flashes beams of light that resemble the eyes of a cat. It is said that Tiger’s Eye has the ability to ward of evil and to assist in thinking clearly. Tiger’s Eye comes in a honey color or a chocolate brown color.

Gem Species: Quartz

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 7

Sources: Australia, India, Myanmar, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and United States

Treatments: Traditional Enhancement

Care: Tiger’s Eye is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight, exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water or an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Topaz

About: Topaz comes in a variety of colors from clear white Topaz to golden Topaz to rich Blue Topaz. Ancient beings prized Topaz; it was believed to dispel enchantments, detect poisons, and even render the wearer invisible. Blue Topaz is found in much greater abundance than Aquamarine and offers a similar color at a lesser cost. Blue Topaz ranges in color from sky blue to deep ocean blue.

Gem Species: Topaz

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 8

Sources: Brazil, Mexico, Namibia, Nigeria, Myanmar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Australia

Treatments: Irradiation

Care: Topaz is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight, exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. To clean, use a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water or an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.

Tourmaline

About: Legend tells of Tourmaline’s power to attract lovers and friends, shield from danger, and protect the wearer from poor decisions. Tourmaline comes in a wide variety of colors, but is most commonly prized in green and pink. Tourmaline celebrates those born in October and is also used to commemorate the 5th and 8th wedding anniversary.

Gem Species: Tourmaline

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 7-7.5

Sources: East Africa, Afghanistan, Brazil, China, India, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, United States, and Tanzania

Treatments: Heating

Care: Tourmaline is rated “fair to good” for everyday wear with care. Avoid exposure to heat and protect from scratches and sharp blows. To clean, gently scrub with a toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water.

Turquoise

About: The color of Turquoise represents a balance between the blue sky above and the ocean below. Cultures worldwide view Turquoise as a mystical and powerful gemstone. The tranquil color of Turquoise is thought to bring a sense of harmony to those who wear it. Turquoise is used to celebrate those born in December and is also used to commemorate the 6th and 11th wedding anniversary

Gem Species: Turquoise

Moh’s Scale (hardness): 5-6

Sources: Australia, United States, Mexico, China, and Chile

Treatments: Impregnation

Care: Turquoise is rated “fair” for everyday wear. Avoid contact with heat, chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows. Clean gently with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and water.

Learn More

Visit Us

112 Church Street
Burlington, VT 05401
(802) 862-1042

Our Store Hours

Tuesday-Saturday 10-5:45